Filthie's Mobile Fortress Of Solitude

Filthie's Mobile Fortress Of Solitude
Where Great Intelligence Goes To Be Insulted

Tuesday, 10 November 2020

 


8 comments:

  1. Mooney M20-C
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mooney_M20

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  2. Cool - I thought it might be that Globe Swift...

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  3. Why is the artificial horizon off by about 20*?...

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    1. Aren’t the gyros centrifugally stabilized? I wonder how they work in the old analog birds? I know how the solid state ones work .... looks like I am off down another rabbit hole...

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    2. I know zilch about aircraft; only that it's the very worst place to be if gravity wins out. 'Was just curious. You're probably right about the gyros...

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    3. I forget if the gyros in the M-20-C were electric or vacuum driven. Either way it is common for them to tumble like that when you shut them down, especially if they are older and a bit worn. Now if you are powered up and in IMC conditions and they tumble it does get a bit sketchy.

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  4. I've never seen a panel on a Mooney, but it sure looks like my Cessna 172, but an older model. That radio stack is obsolete junk. I don't even see a transponder, let alone ADS-B. The ADF, if it even works was obsolete thirty years ago.
    Mine was a 1974 172M, and I put $20K into a panel upgrade to make it an IFR state of the art (at the time) Garmin radio/gps stack.
    The gyro is tilted because it's at a dead stop. The vacuum gauge (the little dial at the top) is at zero as is the tach. No vacuum, no spinning gyros.
    Gotta love the ash tray to the left of the yoke. They all had them back then.
    I sold mine when I retired as it's an insanely expensive hobby to keep one airworthy, and keeping up with hangar fees, insurance, and an annual inspection every year just got to be a depressing drag. Not to mention that avgas (100LL) was five or six bucks a gallon ten years ago. I don't even want to know what it runs now.

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  5. I'm a former Cessna 152 driver. I would feel right at home there, until I looked out the window and said "what's the wing doing THERE?"

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