Filthie's Mobile Fortress Of Solitude

Filthie's Mobile Fortress Of Solitude
Where Great Intelligence Goes To Be Insulted

Tuesday, 30 November 2021

How Do They Do It?






 So how does this work?  The physics of the thing don’t look right at all. Is the rear of the surfboard submerged?  It looks to me like the front of the board should dive and the kids would go swimming…

9 comments:

  1. The tail of the board has to be enveloped in the breaking wave to counter the weight on the front of the board.

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  2. I can own it. I can be honest.
    If I'm in the picture, trust me, it's Photoshop.
    I watch surf videos sometimes and it is amazing how they do that.

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  3. The boards have a longitudinal curve, "rocker", so the tail is sucked down to balance a rider on the nose. Actually getting a long nose=ride takes lots of practice but isn't hard when you've got it wired.

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    1. So how do they submerge the rear of the board to 'hook it into' the water, OS? Jump on it? And how long can they ride the board like that? It's just hydraulics I suppose, where the weight of the water on the rear of the board balances the weight of the surfer...?

      Surfing is as alien to me as skating would be to them, I suppose... ;)

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    2. I'm thinking it works like a wing. An airfoil but upside down sucking the board into the water. So long as you maintain forward speed its stable.

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    3. That's pretty close to what is happening. The tail gets sucked down while the nose is planing. The wave isn't breaking over the back holding it down and you can noseride an unbroken wave.

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  4. How do surfers hang ten? Well, it ain't easy.

    The surfboard isn't flat. It's curved, so that if you took off the skeg (keel) and rested the board on a flat surface, it would rock - kind of like a rocking chair.

    There's a skeg or small keel at the rear of the board. The skeg improves steering - greatly.

    The surfer has to find a wave that will break over the back of the board. The weight of the water plus the curve of the board makes the nose of the board want to go up. To compensate, the surfer moves forward. The surfer progresses through the cheater five to hangin' five, then walkin' the nose, then hangin' ten. In the middle of all this, the surfer learns a lot about pearling.

    Pearling happens when the nose of the board digs into the water, the back end comes up, and the ride turns into a wipe out. The word pearling comes from the phrase pearl diving. Pearl divers would go out in a boat and dive in deep water for pearl oysters, often carrying rocks or weights to get them to the bottom faster. They'd stay down for five minutes - a truly brutal business.

    Meantime, the hodaddys and putting the moves on the beach bunnies - while the poor surfer is coughing up sand and saltwater, and hoping his slats aren't busted.

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