Filthie's Mobile Fortress Of Solitude

Filthie's Mobile Fortress Of Solitude
Where Great Intelligence Goes To Be Insulted

Wednesday, 24 August 2022

Lot A Brass…


What’d they do with it?
Heave it over the side…?
 

9 comments:

  1. Knew a fella who was on destroyers during Vietnam, he said the brass cases from WW2 ammo were saved and passed down the hatch as souvenirs, the then current production zinc cases went over the side.

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    1. had a friend of mine who had one made into a large ash tray.
      not sure what happen to it after he pass away a few years ago. but he did keep it shine up !

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  2. I always assumed that the larger guns on ships were fired like a field artillery piece. Meaning the brass shell (if there even was one) was just a temporary case for the charge and the round was just pushed in. On a larger arty piece there is no brass casing at all the round and powder are just shoved in the breech. So ya I am no help I guess lol.

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    1. When I was a kid all the old timers had ash trays and lamps made out of them.

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  3. My understanding was when the big guns were fired everyone was below decks as the concussion would throw them overboard. So I suspect this photo was taken after a salvo, and all the sea gophers came up on deck for some air.

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  4. Filthie, My father was a shell catcher on a WW II destroyer. Had a large pair of thick mittens to catch the brass. He would throw them out the hatch. He said on Guam they fired all night long. His was #2 mount. He's 99 heading to 100 in March if we're blessed. Mentally still tells me about the news so he is amazing. His ship the Haggard DD 555 was taken out of the war in April '45 by Kimakazes while doing picket duty off Okinawa.

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  5. Was on a destroyer deployed to Vietnam 1970, 1972, and 1973 and I can guarantee the spent shells were tossed overboard. Many times the Captain would shoot the floating casings with his .30 carbine presumably to get them to sink faster (but mostly for fun). Never were allowed to save any of them. I did (attempt) to bring home a .50 cal shell I picked up on deck and it was confiscated from me when I hit Treasure Island for separation. Had a whole bundle of U.S. Government ballpoint pens that they didn't care if I had and let me keep them.

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    1. It's hard to tell by the photo, but those look like 6" propellant casings. Loading those guns, the projectile was rammed first, followed by the casing containing both the propellant and a primer. After the gun was fired, the empty casing was ejected and the entire cycle started over again until cease fire.

      When I was in the USN and attending "C" school, I managed to purloin one of those used casings and it was an ash tray for about a year or so. It was made out of steel, not brass.

      When I got transferred to the west coast, I gave it to my dad but I don't know what became of it. Knowing dad, he probably lost it in a poker game ;-). Hey, don't laugh. He won a 52 Cadillac once in one of those poker games!

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  6. This is a 6" gun, Cleveland class light cruiser. No, the crew did not hide below decks when the guns fired. No, the expended powder cartridges were not kept for reloading. Many were kept as souvenirs, of course.

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