Filthie's Mobile Fortress Of Solitude

Filthie's Mobile Fortress Of Solitude
Where Great Intelligence Goes To Be Insulted

Thursday, 8 December 2022

 



I don’t care how convenient or efficient wood pellet stoves are - I would never have one. I don’t like the technology or their reliance on electric fans to work. I am beginning to think hard about tech-proofing my home. 


11 comments:

  1. about 5-6 years ago, when we moved up here. I installed 2 wood stoves. stainless steel chimneys, the whole works.
    my neighbors thought and said I was nuts not to install pellet stoves
    instead. one small problem with pellet stoves, they all need electric power to work. and 3 winters ago, we had the power out for close to 3 days. a lot of people left to warmer spots with in laws or hotels
    we where just fine. the genny running a couple of hours a day to charge stuff and both stoves keeping the house at 74-6 there about
    while it was in the teens outside.
    wood heat is just better. more even, quiet. and it works.
    best 5 grand I ever spent. btw, a couple of neighbors have gotten wood stoves install since. 2 of them replaced their pellet stoves with wood stoves. if you get one, make sure you can use the top as a cooking surface. I love hearing my coffee pot perk on the stove
    and after it done. I put it on a spacer block to keep warm but not boiling.

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  2. Smart to do that. I have double hung windows in this old hovel. I replaced a few with new double hung windows. Nothing like opening the top and catching a cool breeze in the spring and fall. It makes a big different in livability in this hellscape. If there is one thing that needs thought, it's how to do without utilities for a while and still survive.

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  3. They make pellet stoves that don't require electricity. Not as good as heating a room as one with a fan but my daughter has one and the like it. I had a home with both wood stove and pellet. Used the pellet when the weather was just cool. Fired up the wood burner when the snow flew. The pellet has the advantage pnnot needing to be constantly monitored. Both are superior to relying on the grid for warmth.

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  4. Had the pleasure of working with a most creative guy. He built a horizontally baffled wood stove about 5 feet long. Only the barrel protruded into his family room. The door, wood, and all the mess were in the garage. Tried to sell his house a few years later. House inspector checked with City looking for permit. Everything went downhill from there. Good idea though.

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  5. Pellet stoves are nice, but they require PELLETS. Unless you have a pellet maker, you’re beholden to those who do and the supply chain that feeds them. Wood stoves burn trees. Or pallets, scrap, furniture and on & on. I’ve built a press out of 2x4’s that makes compressed logs about the size of a large can out of a slurry of shredded paper and sawdust. Takes about half a day to make a couple dozen and a couple days for them to dry out. They’ll burn for about 45 mins each…and my total cost for the whole setup was less than 5 bucks.

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    Replies
    1. If you can figure out how use the log press to help the char the bones of your enemies you'd have fertilizer, too!

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  6. We had a nice cast iron wood stove with flat top put in. Its great! Keep the heat set at 65 fvall winter, but wood in the stove. Wearing shorts and Tshirts inside, lol. When the power goes out, we have heat and can boil water.

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  7. When we bought our place here in the high desert country, it was one of those "Super Good Cents" certified all electric houses. Well insulated, but that first winter our electric bill for January was $330. The next summer I installed a woodstove; certified, permitted, and inspected. The county inspector gave me a bit of a compliment. He said "I just wish you could teach some of the people I have to deal with how to do this." The next winter, our January electric bill was $85. We run our electric forced air furnace not at all.
    Yes, wood is not free, even discounting my labor to zero, and it often is a messy hassle, but we love our toasty, warm house when it's cold outside.
    I briefly looked into pellet stoves, but as pointed out already, they require electric power, not just for a fan, but the feed auger too. If there is such a thing as one without outside power, I want to know how it's fed. And those motors, fan or auger, are not silent, though I've heard that some high end ($$$$) ones are not too noisy. Not to mention as also above about being tied to a supply chain for fuel.
    We have a couple of those TEG (thermo electric generator) fans on top of ours to assist circulation, and their best feature is that they are absolutely dead silent.

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  8. Brought a Progress from Woodstock stoves. I am very happy with it - but prices are going up and you KNOW the EPA is gonna try to ban them at some point.

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  9. No matter the venting if she can still smell my farts.

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  10. I have a pellet stove insert, and I stopped using it. It's a pain in the ass to clean, then you have to empty the vacuum you use to clean it, and you cannot do that inside. So, now, it's 20 freakin degrees or less, I have to take the vacuum outside to empty it into the garbage can, the wind is blowing the finely powdered ash back in my face, the filter needs to be cleaned out, another dust storm. Bag of pellets weighs 40 lbs., awkward as hell to dump into the hopper. Then you have to have room for 50 bags if you buy a ton. Half the time it smokes when it starts up, even if you just got done cleaning it. Always fun waking up at 5:30 to go to work and it decided not to come on when it was set to, and it's now 50 degrees in the house, and you have to take a shower. Can't have a smoke detector. Salesman lied and told me it was completely sealed off. Wish I went with propane or natural gas. Nah, sorry I bought it.

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